Camera swinger pictures-Camera: Polaroid Big Swinger · Lomography

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Camera swinger pictures

It's worth pondering for a moment in this era where a new camera model is being introduced approximately every six months, that in those days a photographer might buy a camera such as this and use it for one's entire photographic career. The Swinger featured an Camera swinger pictures exposure meter tied to the aperture which displayed the word "YES" in a window below the viewfinder when the exposure was set correctly. Polaroid Swinger by Eric Bjerke. The Beatles and a Polaroid Swinger. Retrieved 31 May People usually notice swibger the outside of cameras, and usually expect sleek, Chicas con bikinis features for new products. Some wonderful folks I knew in High School who did not care that I was not cool. One of the main themes in architecture: to represent an outdoor space as an interior, and Camera swinger pictures interior space to suggest the outdoors is readily apparent inside this camera.

Jim gaffigan on pregnancy. Camera: Polaroid Big Swinger 3000

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Yesterday was awesome!

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  • The Swinger was especially successful in the youth market due to its low price, stylish appearance, catchy "Meet the Swinger" jingle sung by Barry Manilow and written by Phyllis Robinson [2] , and getting the camera into drugstores.
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Camera swinger pictures

Camera swinger pictures

Camera swinger pictures

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polaroid swinger model 20 photos on Flickr | Flickr

Yesterday was awesome! I drove around to like 20 yard sales with my mom, and I bought an old camera in the photo for 3 dollars! It is a Polaroid land camera, "swinger" model I haven't named it yet and am also not sure it works. I'm going to find an old manual online later. I'm really trying to edit my picture of the day that day, or within a day or so because I've been really bad at that lately.

I found a bunch of my early photography while looking through photos for my Uncle's funeral. This was shot with an old Polaroid "Swinger" that I picked up at a garage sale for fifty cents. I was 11 years old or so at the time which makes me, the camera and the photo "antique". I think I like the words "vintage" or "classic" better though. I found this Polaroid Swinger in an antique shop in Shrewsbury UK a few weeks ago and it is in absolutely incredible condition.

All of the photographs in this set is copyright under Creative Commons. Like the Manhattan's new Moma, this particular design is connected to a previous one, my Gallery Ying that was actually constructed last year. People usually notice only the outside of cameras, and usually expect sleek, elegant features for new products.

Very few will notice the elegance of some camera interiors, as well as moments of architecture In these unseen spaces. These moments vary significantly in quality from camera to camera. From my own modified vintage camera collection, I find that some of the most beautiful interior work is found in the Polaroid Swinger Model If you own one of these, open it up and enjoy some subtle architectural moments.

Inspired by the experience of this, I've tried to design a New Wing to my previous gallery inside a camera. This New Wing will allow the gallery to exhibit a total of up to 29 photographs in addition to two possible lighted projections. One of the main themes in architecture: to represent an outdoor space as an interior, and an interior space to suggest the outdoors is readily apparent inside this camera. Inside the quasi-bellows of this camera I can imagine a staircase in Venice extending down to the water on a moonlit night.

In essence, that triggered in my mind the thought to fabricate a typical analog camera filmwinder to create additional space to exhibit the inside of this gallery.

In the notes above there are barn doors which swing open to create a strong support for the structure but also allow play with the light in the exhibition space. If you haven't viewed my Gallery Ying, please please see the photo below or go to my link below. There is more text with explanations there about this project. I've had to attach two additional lenses, one outside and another inside the body to get the focus right because there's no bellows on this one. The Blu-Tack I bought in hk is a little ugly, but the Subbuteo figure makes up for it, right?

The client is a director of a well-known Canadian fishing association who has traveled to Europe on fly fishing expeditions. He enjoys cigars and scotch during his frequent trips.

The main task was to try to understand both the character of the client and the camera subject so that I could invent an alter ego. The client's British background helped me to locate a suitable structure and detail for his camera. Being an avid fisherman as well as a film luddite added to the personality detail that I was looking for to settle the design. His camera, a Polaroid Swinger Model was an odd and attractive canvas, very well suited to modification.

The featureless gray body made a good contrast to the rich appointments of the interior and was crucial for allowing the eye to simply rest after seeing the completely renovated interior. This is necessary and is an important design feature that I wish to point out; that of letting the eyes rest on something, like an empty wall or the side of a building. This feature isn't normally part of my other designs but I relished the chance to show it off.

This very green camera design takes its initial inspiration from London's Bath Club on Brook Street, there since , and one of a dying breed of traditional British gentlemen's clubs of the past century.

An unusual feature is that one of the Bath Club's many rooms is set aside for the venerable but much smaller Flyfisher's Club. Aside from this Polaroid Land camera's offbeat name and dull grey exterior, its interior is made into an annex to that famous club room and is the world's tiniest member-supported gentlemen's club.

It is grandfathered with a dual membership to its owner for the other two London clubs as well. This club offers a constant supply of Cuban Cohiba mini cigars, box aged at least 8 months. Two of these are kept humidified at any single time inside the camera. The faux-concrete lightwell in the style of one of Tadao Ando's museums allows the photographer the vicarious experience of descending a series of winding paths into the underbelly of the camera to view the club's collection of fishing equipment, mimicking a feature of the London club.

However, the London counterpart never had such an ingenious front entrance. The cigars are each banded with a commemorative club label and are stored also under the same dark theme of an aging cellar. The lightwell's winding paths are lined with site specific moss, garnering for the club many deductions for going green.

This moss garden is hydroponic and a plastic cover not shown in the photo keeps a good humidity that extends down by small tubing to keep the cigars humidified. A maintenance set is provided to hydrate the garden by osmosis through a tube with a wick in it. The club's equally prominent rear entrance is a flat arch. The Intrados is formed by the display cases which hold the client's personal collection of 20 antique fly fishing lures, each meticulously labelled in flowing red script.

Opening the camera back reveals the Impost of this quasi-arch, covered with a rich luxurious leather and embossed with the original Flyfisher Club's Latin motto. This Polaroid would have to be digitized in order to provide the necessary extra space for the renovation. The digital modification is straightforward and is similar to my other camera modifications. All that remains is to apply some gloss black shoe polish and buff it out, load some film into a holder, find an appropriate subject, set the controls properly, pull out the dark slide Unfortunately, creating the memorable image is the hard part, and no camera, be it a Graflex or the latest, greatest, most expensive and feature rich, digital camera from Japan, with the most gigantic and expensive zoom lens money can buy attached to it, is going to do it on it's own.

For the easy part, I searched the R. Auto model of Graflex on the internet and found that they were made from , having the longest production of any Graflex model, but many other models also had a very long production run.

The Speed Graphic actually had a longer production run, something like 50 years, but it's not a Graflex because it's not an SLR.

I just figured out that the "flex" is short for Reflex. It's worth pondering for a moment in this era where a new camera model is being introduced approximately every six months, that in those days a photographer might buy a camera such as this and use it for one's entire photographic career.

Everything was a lot slower back then There is no doubt that photography is mostly not about the camera, but in the world of digital photography the companies making cameras have seriously promoted the camera as much more a part of the creative process than ever before.

This is not to assert that the camera has not been advertised as the salvation to pretty much everything to do with photography in the past though. In fact, historically, that's probably the most common advertising theme.

One can also see that film cameras were a very poor business model, especially those made in the era when products were made to last forever, which was pretty much the entire film camera era. Kodak responded to this problem by regularly introducing new film formats that would require a photographer that wanted to use the format to buy a new camera, often also also introduced by Kodak. My parents fell into this trap a couple of times. I was given a Kodak Disc camera for some occasion, and a Polaroid Swinger that I couldn't afford to buy film for for another.

Previous to that I had a Brownie Starfire camera, which was certainly a better camera by virtue of it's larger format. My dad's camera was a Brownie Hawkeye camera, that he owned from the 50's until he got a Polaroid and a Instamatic. Photos from the Instamatic are very good as it has a reasonable sized negative. I have been scanning some of the transparencies he took in the 60's with the Instamatic, before they self-destruct. It seems strange that Kodak did not recognize a long time ago that the handwriting was on the wall, because by the time the camera above was made in , there were cameras still in active use that were at least 50 years old.

My favorite camera, the Mamiya RB67, is from the mid '80s, so 30 plus years old. This might not be possible with digital but my two aging digital cameras are still working just fine after 12 and 14 years, not to mention the phone, so who knows. Digital cameras have been an absolute godsend for the camera industry, which had become moribund because the last of the 35mm SLR were cameras that are working to this day along with most that were made before them; also the introduction of the point and shoot 35mm film camera, many of which are also still working just fine.

Kodak didn't invent 35mm, but they did invent the daylight cartridge, and the first camera to use it, which was the Retina, which makes the Retina perhaps the most important camera in the history of photography. Retinas are a wonderful design and still take a great photo. If you have one, join my Kodak Retina group www. It's worth noting that Kodak invented and patented the sensor that is the heart of the digital camera, but their management was so inept at that time that they chose not to capitalize on it, fearing that it would cannibalize their film business.

Ultimately they lost nearly everything because of their stupidity. I bet on their stock and lost, so I also am chastened. As naive as it sounds, I was mostly just trying to help. The serial number of this camera is stamped into the inside of the top door, and this camera dates to , as near as I can determine. Eastman Kodak had a huge amount of money back in the old days and bought a lot of camera companies.

The history of their acquisitions can be found elsewhere on the web. EK owned Folmer and Schwing for quite a while but was forced by the US government to sell the company in because of anti-trust laws, missing out on the potential notoriety of some of the most famous photos in history being taken with Graflex cameras.

The Graflex SLR was used by Steiglitz for his cloud "Equivalents" photos, by Dorothea Lange for her famous series taken for the FSA during the depression including one of the most memorable photos ever made , and by many other photographers. Not too long after selling Graflex, EK purchased Nagelwerk in Germany perhaps avoiding anti-trust laws? Back to this camera, I replaced the orginal leather viewing hood with one from the parts Graflex, because the leather original was starting to split.

Still very serviceable but the later model is made from some kind of rubberized stuff with a cool fuzzy fringe around the top, so I decided to preserve the original for posterity. Amazingly, this camera is nearly 80 years old, and with a basic servicing and replacement of the damaged escutcheon, is probably good for more years of service than I'm going to need. This camera was produced during an era when products were built to last.

Even the shutter curtain is in remarkably good condition. Admittedly this is a late model, but the RB was introduced in the Model T era. Just something to ponder.

When I look down into the hood, draw the lens into focus and see the beautiful image materialize in the huge ground glass, I don't really even need to take a photo. It's wonderful just to peer into.

Camera swinger pictures

Camera swinger pictures

Camera swinger pictures