Prostate specific antegin-Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

We use cookies to improve your experience on our website. By continuing to browse this website you accept our cookie policy. The PSA test is a blood test that can help diagnose prostate problems, including prostate cancer. There are advantages and disadvantages to having a PSA test. We know that some men have trouble getting a PSA test.

Prostate specific antegin

Prostate specific antegin

Prostate specific antegin

Abnormal results in these tests may lead your doctor to recommend a prostate biopsy. Genetics of Prostate Cancer. The doctor may use ultrasound to view the prostate during the biopsy, Prostafe ultrasound cannot be used alone to diagnose Prostate specific antegin cancer. How long will I have to wait for my PSA test results? Advertising revenue supports our not-for-profit mission. Busty paola soft diagnosis of cancer is based spefific the biopsy results. Journal of Molecular Biology. Therefore, a Prostate specific antegin may have prostate cancer that never causes symptoms or becomes a medical problem during his lifetime. Grants Management Contacts. Journal of Clinical Laboratory Analysis.

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Ask about: Whether screening decreases your chance of dying from prostate cancer Whether there is any harm from prostate cancer screening, such as side-effects from testing or overtreatment of cancer when discovered Men younger than age 55 have a higher chance of developing prostate cancer and should talk with their provider about PSA screening if they: Have a family history of prostate cancer especially a brother or father Are African American. More significantly, PSA remains present in prostate cells after they become malignant. Journal of Forensic Sciences. Childhood Cancer Genomics. Thyroid cancer Thyroglobulin Medullary thyroid cancer Calcitonin Carcinoembryonic antigen. Prostate Cancer Free is a c 3 non-profit, so your donation is tax deductible. However, a single elevated PSA Teen gay sex sample clip in a patient who has a history of prostate cancer does not always mean that the cancer has come back. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has analyzed the data from all reported prostate cancer screening trials, principally from the PLCO and ERSPC trials, and estimated that, for every 1, men ages 55 to 69 years who are screened Prostate specific antegin 1 to 4 years for 10 to 15 years 7 :. Advanced Cancer and Caregivers. Prostate specific antegin blood from some people may be more difficult than from others. Returning prostate cancer cells, confined to the prostate or that have spread to the bone or lymph nodes, will cause the PSA to rise. While PSA testing may help 1 in 1, avoid death due to prostate cancer, 4 to 5 in 1, would die from prostate cancer after 10 years even Prostate specific antegin screening.

PSA is a protein made by prostate cells.

  • PSA is a member of the kallikrein -related peptidase family and is secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland.
  • Prostate Specific Antigen or PSA , is an enzyme found in a man's blood produced exclusively by prostate cells.
  • Make sure your health care provider knows all the medicines you are taking.

PSA is a member of the kallikrein -related peptidase family and is secreted by the epithelial cells of the prostate gland. PSA is produced for the ejaculate , where it liquefies semen in the seminal coagulum and allows sperm to swim freely.

PSA is present in small quantities in the serum of men with healthy prostates, but is often elevated in the presence of prostate cancer or other prostate disorders. Clinical practice guidelines for prostate cancer screening vary and are controversial due to uncertainty as to whether the benefits of screening ultimately outweigh the risks of overdiagnosis and overtreatment.

The patient needs to be informed of the risks and benefits of PSA testing prior to performing the test see below. If indicated, prostate biopsy is performed to obtain a tissue sample for histopathological analysis.

In the United Kingdom, the National Health Service does not mandate, nor advise for PSA test, but allows patients to decide based on their doctor's advice. While PSA testing may help 1 in 1, avoid death due to prostate cancer, 4 to 5 in 1, would die from prostate cancer after 10 years even with screening. Expected harms include anxiety for — receiving false positives, biopsy pain, and other complications from biopsy for false positive tests. Of those found to have prostate cancer, frequent overtreatment is common because most cases of prostate cancer are not expected to cause any symptoms.

Therefore, many will experience the side effects of treatment, such as for every men screened, 29 will experience erectile dysfunction, 18 will suffer urinary incontinence, 2 will have serious cardiovascular events, one will suffer pulmonary embolus or deep venous thrombosis, and one perioperative death. PSA level is one of three variables on which the risk-stratification is based; the others are the grade of prostate cancer Gleason grading system and the stage of cancer based on physical examination and imaging studies.

D'Amico Criteria for each risk category are as follows: [15]. Given the relative simplicity of the D'Amico criteria above , other predictive models of risk stratification based on mathematical probability constructs exist or have been proposed to allow for better matching of treatment decisions with disease features. PSA levels are monitored periodically e.

If surgical therapy i. A subsequent rise in PSA level above 0. Following radiation therapy of any type for prostate cancer, some PSA levels might be detected, even when the treatment ultimately proves to be successful. PSA levels may continue to decrease for several years after radiation therapy.

The lowest level is referred to as the PSA nadir. A subsequent increase in PSA levels by 2. If recurrent prostate cancer is detected by a rise in PSA levels after curative treatment, it is referred to as a " biochemical recurrence ". Low-risk cancers are the least likely to recur, but they are also the least likely to have required treatment in the first place.

PSA is produced in the epithelial cells of the prostate, and can be demonstrated in biopsy samples or other histological specimens using immunohistochemistry. Disruption of this epithelium, for example in inflammation or benign prostatic hyperplasia , may lead to some diffusion of the antigen into the tissue around the epithelium, and is the cause of elevated blood levels of PSA in these conditions.

More significantly, PSA remains present in prostate cells after they become malignant. Prostate cancer cells generally have variable or weak staining for PSA, due to the disruption of their normal functioning. Thus, individual prostate cancer cells produce less PSA than healthy cells; the raised serum levels in prostate cancer patients is due to the greatly increased number of such cells, not their individual activity.

However, in most cases of prostate cancer, the cells remain positive for the antigen, which can therefore be used to identify metastasis. PSA was first identified by researchers attempting to find a substance in seminal fluid that would aid in the investigation of rape cases. Because PSA is a biomarker that is expressed independently of spermatozoa , it remains useful in identifying semen from vasectomized and azoospermic males.

PSA can also be found at low levels in other body fluids, such as urine and breast milk, thus setting a high minimum threshold of interpretation to rule out false positive results and conclusively state that semen is present. The physiological function of KLK3 is the dissolution of the coagulum, the sperm entrapping gel composed of semenogelins and fibronectin.

Its proteolytic action is effective in liquefying the coagulum so that the sperm can be liberated. The activity of PSA is well regulated. In the prostate, it is present as an inactive pro-form which is activated through the action of KLK2 , another kallikrein-related peptidase.

In the prostate, zinc ion concentrations are ten times higher than in other bodily fluids. Further regulation is achieved through pH variations. Although its activity is increased by higher pH, the inhibitory effect of zinc also increases.

The pH of semen is slightly alkaline and the concentrations of zinc are high. On ejaculation, semen is exposed to the acidic pH of the vagina , due to the presence of lactic acid. In fertile couples, the final vaginal pH after coitus approaches the levels, which coincides well with reduced zinc inhibition of PSA.

At these pH levels, the reduced PSA activity is countered by a decrease in zinc inhibition. Thus, the coagulum is slowly liquefied, releasing the sperm in a well-regulated manner. It is a serine protease EC 3. The discovery of prostate-specific antigen PSA is beset with controversy; as PSA is present in prostatic tissue and semen, it was independently discovered and given different names, thus adding to the controversy. Flocks was the first to experiment with antigens in the prostate [27] and 10 years later Ablin reported the presence of precipitation antigens in the prostate.

In , Mitsuwo Hara characterized a unique protein in the semen fluid, gamma-seminoprotein. Li and Beling, in , isolated a protein, E1, from human semen in an attempt to find a novel method to achieve fertility control.

In , Sensabaugh identified semen-specific protein p30, but proved that it was similar to E1 protein, and that prostate was the source. PSA was first measured quantitatively in the blood by Papsidero in , [33] and Stamey carried out the initial work on the clinical use of PSA as a marker of prostate cancer.

PSA is normally present in the blood at very low levels. Increased levels of PSA may suggest the presence of prostate cancer.

However, prostate cancer can also be present in the complete absence of an elevated PSA level, in which case the test result would be a false negative. Obesity has been reported to reduce serum PSA levels. PSA levels can be also increased by prostatitis , irritation, benign prostatic hyperplasia BPH , and recent ejaculation, [39] [40] producing a false positive result.

However, the effect is clinically insignificant, since DRE causes the most substantial increases in patients with PSA levels already elevated over 4. The "normal" reference ranges for prostate-specific antigen increase with age, as do the usual ranges in cancer, as per table below.

Despite earlier findings, [44] recent research suggests that the rate of increase of PSA e. However, the PSA rate of rise may have value in prostate cancer prognosis. Men with prostate cancer whose PSA level increased by more than 2. Men who are known to be at risk for prostate cancer, and who decide to plot their PSA values as a function of time i. An exponential growth in PSA values appears as a straight line [49] on a semi-log plot, so that a new PSA value significantly above the straight line signals a switch to a new and significantly higher growth rate, [49] i.

Most PSA in the blood is bound to serum proteins. A small amount is not protein-bound and is called 'free PSA'. See graph at right. The lower the ratio is, the greater the probability of prostate cancer.

Measuring the activity of the enzyme could add to the ratio of free-to-total PSA and further improve the diagnostic value of test. PSA exists in serum in the free unbound form and in a complex with alpha 1-antichymotrypsin ; research has been conducted to see if measurements of complexed PSA are more specific and sensitive biomarkers for prostate cancer than other approaches.

It is now clear that the term prostate-specific antigen is a misnomer : it is an antigen but is not specific to the prostate. Although present in large amounts in prostatic tissue and semen, it has been detected in other body fluids and tissues. In women, PSA is found in female ejaculate at concentrations roughly equal to that found in male semen.

Low concentrations of PSA have been identified in the urethral glands, endometrium, normal breast tissue and salivary gland tissue. PSA also is found in the serum of women with breast, lung, or uterine cancer and in some patients with renal cancer.

Tissue samples can be stained for the presence of PSA in order to determine the origin of malignant cells that have metastasized. Prostate-specific antigen has been shown to interact with protein C inhibitor. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Chromosome 19 human [1]. Main article: Prostate cancer screening. This section does not cite any sources.

Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. July Learn how and when to remove this template message. National Center for Biotechnology Information, U. National Library of Medicine. Journal of Clinical Oncology. American Society of Andrology Handbook. San Francisco: American Society of Andrology. May The Journal of Urology. International Journal of Molecular Sciences.

October The Canadian Journal of Urology. NHS Choices. Retrieved 2 July April Canadian Urological Association Journal. Sperling Prostate Center. Retrieved 31 March

Lung cancer Carcinoembryonic antigen Enolase 2 Autocrine motility factor. If higher than normal levels are discovered, action is recommended. The New York Times. For example, a man whose total PSA is 6. Greenwich Medical Media, Ltd.

Prostate specific antegin

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Only a prostate biopsy can diagnose this cancer. Your provider will look at your PSA result and consider your age, ethnicity, medicines you are taking, and other things to decide whether your PSA is normal and whether you need more tests. PSA testing is an important tool for detecting prostate cancer, but it is not foolproof. Other conditions can cause a rise in PSA, including:. If you have been treated for prostate cancer, the PSA level can show if treatment is working or if the cancer has come back.

Often, PSA level rises before there are any symptoms. This may happen months or years beforehand. There is little risk involved with having your blood taken. Veins and arteries vary in size from one person to another, and from one side of the body to the other. Taking blood from some people may be more difficult than from others.

Other risks associated with having blood drawn are slight, but may include:. Prostate cancer tumor markers. Campbell-Walsh Urology. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; chap National Cancer Institute website. Prostate cancer screening PDQ - health professional version. Updated February 22, Accessed June 4, PMID: www.

Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Editorial team. Prostate-specific antigen PSA blood test. Prostate-specific antigen PSA is a protein produced by prostate cells. The PSA test is done to help diagnose and follow prostate cancer in men. How the Test is Performed. A blood sample is needed. How to Prepare for the Test. How the Test will Feel. Why the Test is Performed. Reasons for a PSA test: This test may be done to screen for prostate cancer.

It is also used to follow people after prostate cancer treatment to see if the cancer has come back. If a provider feels the prostate gland is not normal during physical exam.

Ask about: Whether screening decreases your chance of dying from prostate cancer Whether there is any harm from prostate cancer screening, such as side-effects from testing or overtreatment of cancer when discovered Men younger than age 55 have a higher chance of developing prostate cancer and should talk with their provider about PSA screening if they: Have a family history of prostate cancer especially a brother or father Are African American.

A normal PSA level is considered to be 4. For men in their 50s or younger, a PSA level should be below 2. In the past, most doctors considered PSA levels of 4. Therefore, if a man had a PSA level above 4. However, more recent studies have shown that some men with PSA levels below 4.

Prostate biopsies and prostate surgery also increase PSA level. PSA level may also vary somewhat across testing laboratories. Another complicating factor is that studies to establish the normal range of PSA levels have been conducted primarily in populations of white men.

Although expert opinions vary, there is no clear consensus regarding the optimal PSA threshold for recommending a prostate biopsy for men of any racial or ethnic group. If a man who has no symptoms of prostate cancer chooses to undergo prostate cancer screening and is found to have an elevated PSA level, the doctor may recommend another PSA test to confirm the original finding.

A urine test may be recommended to check for a urinary tract infection. The doctor may also recommend imaging tests, such as a transrectal ultrasound , x-rays , or cystoscopy. If prostate cancer is suspected, the doctor will recommend a prostate biopsy. During this procedure, multiple samples of prostate tissue are collected by inserting hollow needles into the prostate and then withdrawing them. Most often, the needles are inserted through the wall of the rectum transrectal biopsy.

A pathologist then examines the collected tissue under a microscope. The doctor may use ultrasound to view the prostate during the biopsy, but ultrasound cannot be used alone to diagnose prostate cancer. Detecting prostate cancer early may not reduce the chance of dying from prostate cancer. When used in screening, the PSA test can help detect small tumors that do not cause symptoms.

Overtreatment exposes men unnecessarily to the potential complications and harmful side effects of treatments for early prostate cancer, including surgery and radiation therapy. The side effects of these treatments include urinary incontinence inability to control urine flow , problems with bowel function , erectile dysfunction loss of erections , or having erections that are inadequate for sexual intercourse , and infection.

In addition, finding cancer early may not help a man who has a fast-growing or aggressive tumor that may have spread to other parts of the body before being detected. The PSA test may give false-positive or false-negative results.

A false-positive test result may create anxiety for a man and his family and lead to additional medical procedures, such as a prostate biopsy, that can be harmful. Possible side effects of biopsies include serious infections, pain, and bleeding. False-negative test results may give a man, his family, and his doctor false assurance that he does not have cancer, when he may in fact have a cancer that requires treatment.

Several randomized trials of prostate cancer screening have been carried out. The PLCO investigators found that men who underwent annual prostate cancer screening had a higher incidence of prostate cancer than men in the control group but the same rate of deaths from the disease 3.

Overall, the results suggest that many men were treated for prostate cancers that would not have been detected in their lifetime without screening.

Consequently, these men were exposed unnecessarily to the potential harms of treatment. In contrast to the PLCO, however, men who were screened had a lower rate of death from prostate cancer 4 , 5. A recent paper analyzed data from the PLCO using a complicated statistical model to account for the fact that some men in the PLCO trial who were assigned to the control group had nevertheless undergone PSA screening.

This analysis suggested that the level of benefit in the PLCO and ERSPC trials were similar and that both trials were consistent with some reduction in prostate cancer death in association with prostate cancer screening 6.

Such statistical modeling studies have important limitations and rely on unverified assumptions that can render their findings questionable or more suitable for further study than to serve as a basis for screening guidelines. More importantly, the model could not provide an assessment of the balance of benefits versus harms from screening. The United States Preventive Services Task Force has analyzed the data from all reported prostate cancer screening trials, principally from the PLCO and ERSPC trials, and estimated that, for every 1, men ages 55 to 69 years who are screened every 1 to 4 years for 10 to 15 years 7 :.

The PSA test is often used to monitor patients who have a history of prostate cancer to see if their cancer has recurred come back. However, a single elevated PSA measurement in a patient who has a history of prostate cancer does not always mean that the cancer has come back. A man who has been treated for prostate cancer should discuss an elevated PSA level with his doctor.

The doctor may recommend repeating the PSA test or performing other tests to check for evidence of a recurrence. Scientists are investigating ways to improve the PSA test to give doctors the ability to better distinguish cancerous from benign conditions and slow-growing cancers from fast-growing, potentially lethal cancers. None has been proven to decrease the risk of death from prostate cancer.

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Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) Test - National Cancer Institute

PSA is a protein made by prostate cells. It is mostly found in semen, but small amounts of PSA can also be found in the blood of healthy men. A PSA test is often used together with a digital rectal exam DRE to increase the chance of finding prostate cancer early when it is easier to treat.

Using these tests together is better than using either test alone. Men older than 50 years should talk to their doctor about their personal risk of developing prostate cancer and the benefits and risks of having a PSA test. The Canadian Cancer Society recommends that you should also talk to your doctor about PSA testing if you: will soon be 50 years old have a family history of prostate cancer or are of African ancestry have symptoms of prostate cancer. A PSA test can find prostate cancer early, before it grows large or spreads outside of the prostate.

Finding cancer early can mean that treatments will be more successful. This happens quite often with PSA testing and only about 1 in 4 abnormal results is due to cancer. A false-positive result can lead to unnecessary follow-up testing that is more invasive, such as repeated biopsies. It can also cause men and their families unnecessary anxiety and distress.

A false-negative result means that the test shows that the PSA level is normal even though prostate cancer is present. Getting a false-negative result may mean that a man and his doctor ignore symptoms of prostate cancer. But most men diagnosed with prostate cancer still choose to have treatment. Unnecessary follow-up testing and treatment put a man at risk for problems, including erectile dysfunction and loss of bladder control called urinary incontinence.

A PSA test is a blood test that is done in a lab or hospital. Ejaculation can affect PSA levels in the body, so you may be told not to ejaculate for a few days before the test. Tell your doctor if you are taking drugs to treat benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostatitis, urinary problems or baldness. These drugs can lower PSA levels. Doctors have a hard time agreeing on what is a normal PSA level. Your doctor will help you determine your risk of prostate cancer in relation to your age, family history and other personal information.

High PSA levels can also be caused by: an enlarged prostate due to benign prostatic hyperplasia an inflamed or infected prostate called prostatitis a urinary tract infection a recent medical test or procedure on the prostate, such as a transrectal ultrasound TRUS or biopsy a urinary catheter a bladder exam sexual activity that includes ejaculation bike riding often or a recent long bike ride warmer climates.

Sometimes the PSA level goes up temporarily after a couple of years of receiving radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer. This is called a PSA bounce. In most cases, the PSA level will fall the next time it is checked.

There is no limit to how high a PSA level may rise. But some men with prostate cancer will have a normal PSA level. For these reasons, researchers are still trying to find out the best way to use the PSA test to find prostate cancer. They are also looking for other ways to find prostate cancer early. If you have a high PSA level, your doctor will talk to you about your options.

Together you will decide if you need other tests, procedures, follow-up care or treatment. The type of follow-up care you receive will depend on whether or not you have already been diagnosed with prostate cancer.

The result of the follow-up PSA test is compared to the first test. If your PSA level continues to rise or the doctor feels a lump on the prostate during a DRE, follow-up tests may also include: urine tests, such as a urinalysis a transrectal ultrasound TRUS x-rays a bladder exam called a cystoscopy a prostate biopsy. They can be used to follow up on a high PSA level. Researchers are also trying to find out if they can find prostate cancer better than with regular PSA testing. It is less useful at diagnosing prostate cancer.

Some research shows that PSA velocity that rises quickly can help doctors diagnose prostate cancer. The result is calculated in time. PSA doubling time can help doctors find out if a prostate cancer is aggressive, which means it is more likely to grow quickly and spread. In the blood, PSA is either bound or free unbound.

Bound PSA means that it is attached to other proteins. PSA that is not attached to other proteins is called free PSA because it circulates freely in the blood. Free PSA levels are often higher in men with non-cancerous conditions of the prostate and lower in men with prostate cancer.

It is calculated by taking the PSA level and dividing by the prostate volume. PSA levels are usually higher in men with enlarged prostates. PSAD of the transition zone is the level of PSA in the blood in relation to the volume of the transition zone of the prostate. PSAD of the transition zone seems to be more accurate than PSAD of the entire prostate at identifying which men have benign prostatic hyperplasia and which men have prostate cancer. Nomograms are statistical models that predict probable outcome.

Prostate cancer nomograms look at PSA results and a number of other factors, such as age, ethnicity, family history, urinary symptoms, DRE results and prostate biopsy results.

In males, the urethra passes through the prostate and penis and carries semen as well as urine. In females, the urethra opens above the vaginal opening. Call us toll-free at Or write us. We will reply by email or phone if you leave us your details. If we are not able to reach you by phone, we will leave a voicemail message.

Read more. The latest Canadian Cancer Statistics report shows about half of Canadians are expected to be diagnosed with cancer in their lifetime. Learn more. Select the text below and copy the link. Who should have a PSA test Men older than 50 years should talk to their doctor about their personal risk of developing prostate cancer and the benefits and risks of having a PSA test.

Benefits A PSA test can find prostate cancer early, before it grows large or spreads outside of the prostate. Risks PSA testing carries the following risks. High PSA levels can also be caused by: an enlarged prostate due to benign prostatic hyperplasia an inflamed or infected prostate called prostatitis a urinary tract infection a recent medical test or procedure on the prostate, such as a transrectal ultrasound TRUS or biopsy a urinary catheter a bladder exam sexual activity that includes ejaculation bike riding often or a recent long bike ride warmer climates Sometimes the PSA level goes up temporarily after a couple of years of receiving radiation therapy to treat prostate cancer.

Nomograms Nomograms are statistical models that predict probable outcome. First name:. Last name:. Email address:. Phone Number:. Postal code:. Stories Improving supportive care for children with cancer. Links to help you Publications Talk to an information specialist Talk to someone who's been there Connect with our online community.

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Prostate specific antegin

Prostate specific antegin