President of oral roberts university-

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President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

Join us. AcademicAuthorEvangelist. If you are a subscriber: Simply log in for unlimited access. Sign up! Views Read Edit View history. The lawsuit includes an allegation that the president of Oral Roberts University, Richard Universitj, illegally mobilized students to campaign for a Republican mayoral candidate.

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Come experience the Holy Land and celebrate what the Holy Spirit is doing around the world! March 6, at pm. The Christian Post. They need to touch…, feel…, meet…, and experience the situational moment that persecuted Christians are in. William Wilsonas Lace sandys trim as special guests, including some of the world's biggest and most well-known pastors, President of oral roberts university, and spiritual leaders. Redirected from President of Oral Roberts University. Founded to educate the whole person — spirit, mind and body — Oral Roberts University promises a thorough education in the context of a vibrant Christ-centered community. The university received its charter the following year in from the State of Oklahoma and Oral Roberts University officially opened in with an enrollment of students and with seven major completed buildings. But for Gen Z it is acute. Campus Life.

The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total.

  • Founded in , the university is named after its founder, evangelist Oral Roberts , and accredited by the Higher Learning Commission.
  • Charisma News caught up with Wilson just hours before the official announcement to discuss his vision for ORU in an exclusive interview.
  • Oral Roberts University inaugurated its new president Friday during a ceremony attended by over 4, students, faculty, staff, and alumni, with community leaders and friends.
  • William M.

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Subscribe now. Updated: October 27, pm. Wilson for 10 years. Tulsa World journalism makes a difference. Be part of the story. Join us. This agreement provides long-term stability for the university and sets it on a trajectory to be firmly established as the premier spirit-empowered university around the world.

The agreement keeps Wilson as ORU president until at least Wilson was hired as president on June 1, He also said the university is healthier than ever with no debt, continued enrollment growth and new apartment-style housing on the way.

Wilson also led the university through several years of enrollment growth, strong student retention rates, and an all-time high student-placement rate.

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During the first decade of the school's existence, enrollment increased at a rapid pace; also during this time, many of the campus' iconic structures were completed, such as the Howard Auditorium, the Graduate Center, the Mabee Center, and Christ's Chapel among others. Get help. Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox! July Learn how and when to remove this template message. Show Me More. A typical chapel service features contemporary worship , a missions offering, special music, and a sermon , typically from the President of the University, Dr. Get Spirit-filled content delivered right to your inbox!

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university. Related Articles

Vicari: Identity can be a major challenge too. What about the identity crisis of gender and sexuality among younger generations? Wilson: Those issues at ORU are not as acute as other campuses. Obviously, the world we live in makes a young person question everything, no matter Christian or non-Christian. I have a lot of college president friends, so I know this is a big issue.

Broken families, single parents, all kinds of situations, and to be honest, more disparate backgrounds with their backgrounds with their parents. What I mean is one parent may come from Africa and the other parent from Alaska. Gen Z loves diversity and they celebrate diversity like no other generation in history. A recent Barna study found Generation Z is more non-religious than any generation before them. Can you share your thoughts on the Barna study?

Most of them very committed to Christ. And yet, they would tell you that many of their friends would not be that way, especially back home. I think even with those who are committed to Christ, they are much less religious than other generations.

Gen Z rejects labels. They would resist the term Evangelical, to a certain degree. They would resist the terms even Pentecostal or Charismatic. They want to walk out their faith in their way and live that out. So I predict that the Church will be changed by Generation Z more than by any generation in history. Wilson: It could be for the good. It could not be for the good. I myself heard these criticism growing up in the Assemblies of God denomination. To some extent, I can now see where the criticisms stem from even if they are sometimes exaggerated.

As President of ORU, are incoming spirit-filled students lacking in their understanding of the Gospel when they arrive at college? About half of the class come from homeschools, Christian schools, and etcetera. They could almost teach the class. The other half of the class knows very little. Even though they come from Christian families and many of them very large Christian churches, they come without a very deep root.

Vicari: For clergy and lay leaders who see this lacking theological grounding in some Generation Z Christians, how would you encourage them to better disciple those students in their communities?

Help me know how to live. I think pastors should capitalize on that and answer the hard questions. We have a generation emerging from these churches that really are not deep enough in their faith to handle the tough issues they are facing.

Vicari: I hear you emphasizing a cross-generation mentorship, am I right? Wilson: In every generation there has been a cry for mentorship.

But for Gen Z it is acute. So what I find in this generation, though they are very addicted to technology, a bit relationally awkward, and will sit around a table within three feet of each other and text each other instead of talk, I find when I give them face-to-face time as a mentor, it is huge. At Oral Roberts University, we see the role of faculty changing in the future.

Instead of being dispensers of knowledge and the sage on the stage, we as faculty become the guide by the side. Mentoring will be a huge issue for faculty over the next ten years. We must become better models and better mentors. At ORU we rank eight in the nation in student engagement. Vicari: You are the chairman of an organized movement of Pentecostals working to do just that, called Empowered Wilson: Empowered 21 is sort of a kingdom initiative. We call it a relational network of spirit-empowered Believers around the world who really are focused on the future of spirit-empowered Christianity.

Renewalists, Charismatics, Pentecostals—we call them spirit-empowered Believers—now number over million people in the world. It is the fastest part of Christianity, and actually the fastest-growing religious movement, on planet earth right now. We use words like build vocabulary bridges for them. To help them understand and connect with the faith and connect with spirit-filled life. And how do you live that out?

So this is an initiative of all over the world on that. We have regional cabinets going on. But the real underlying question is two or three-fold. During Friday's ceremony, Rutland said he was aware that he is coming into "a great university already in progress.

Though not officially inaugurated until Friday, Rutland, who was elected in January following a month search, marked his first official day as ORU's third president and the first without the Roberts name on July 1.

Rutland had remained as Southeastern's president until this past year's spring commencement on May 2. CP Current Page: U. Sunday, September 27, Women in ministry: John MacArthur owes you an apology.

Not only does Dr. Wilson kindly sat down with me to discuss the blessings and challenges surrounding the rising generation of spirit-filled Believers. What are the encouraging trends you see among Generation Z on your campus? Wilson: There is a mark difference between Gen Z and Millennials. We see it very significantly on campus and I can talk to that in a few moments.

They are trying to figure what their purpose is and what their identity is—identity is a big question for Gen Z—and how do they live out that identity in a world that is getting larger all the time, which makes them sometimes feel smaller all the time. So how do they make a difference in that kind of world? I find in ministering and preaching to this generation, which I do at chapel on a regular basis, that they really want straight talk, straight answers.

They know the Gospel is more than that. So they want the tough questions answered. Actually, the deeper I go in chapel in preaching— I have to educate as I go—but they love that. They love answers to really tough questions in life and what the Bible has to say about the really big issues.

I mean, they liked to be entertained too. So that brings me a lot of hope as a college president that they are going to discover the truth of the Gospel and make a difference in the world. Vicari: Identity can be a major challenge too. What about the identity crisis of gender and sexuality among younger generations?

Wilson: Those issues at ORU are not as acute as other campuses. Obviously, the world we live in makes a young person question everything, no matter Christian or non-Christian. I have a lot of college president friends, so I know this is a big issue. Broken families, single parents, all kinds of situations, and to be honest, more disparate backgrounds with their backgrounds with their parents.

What I mean is one parent may come from Africa and the other parent from Alaska. Gen Z loves diversity and they celebrate diversity like no other generation in history. A recent Barna study found Generation Z is more non-religious than any generation before them. Can you share your thoughts on the Barna study? Most of them very committed to Christ. And yet, they would tell you that many of their friends would not be that way, especially back home. I think even with those who are committed to Christ, they are much less religious than other generations.

Gen Z rejects labels. They would resist the term Evangelical, to a certain degree. They would resist the terms even Pentecostal or Charismatic. They want to walk out their faith in their way and live that out. So I predict that the Church will be changed by Generation Z more than by any generation in history. Wilson: It could be for the good. It could not be for the good. I myself heard these criticism growing up in the Assemblies of God denomination. To some extent, I can now see where the criticisms stem from even if they are sometimes exaggerated.

As President of ORU, are incoming spirit-filled students lacking in their understanding of the Gospel when they arrive at college? About half of the class come from homeschools, Christian schools, and etcetera. They could almost teach the class. The other half of the class knows very little. Even though they come from Christian families and many of them very large Christian churches, they come without a very deep root.

Vicari: For clergy and lay leaders who see this lacking theological grounding in some Generation Z Christians, how would you encourage them to better disciple those students in their communities? Help me know how to live. I think pastors should capitalize on that and answer the hard questions. We have a generation emerging from these churches that really are not deep enough in their faith to handle the tough issues they are facing. Vicari: I hear you emphasizing a cross-generation mentorship, am I right?

Wilson: In every generation there has been a cry for mentorship. But for Gen Z it is acute. So what I find in this generation, though they are very addicted to technology, a bit relationally awkward, and will sit around a table within three feet of each other and text each other instead of talk, I find when I give them face-to-face time as a mentor, it is huge.

At Oral Roberts University, we see the role of faculty changing in the future. Instead of being dispensers of knowledge and the sage on the stage, we as faculty become the guide by the side. Mentoring will be a huge issue for faculty over the next ten years. We must become better models and better mentors. At ORU we rank eight in the nation in student engagement. Vicari: You are the chairman of an organized movement of Pentecostals working to do just that, called Empowered Wilson: Empowered 21 is sort of a kingdom initiative.

We call it a relational network of spirit-empowered Believers around the world who really are focused on the future of spirit-empowered Christianity.

Renewalists, Charismatics, Pentecostals—we call them spirit-empowered Believers—now number over million people in the world. It is the fastest part of Christianity, and actually the fastest-growing religious movement, on planet earth right now. We use words like build vocabulary bridges for them. To help them understand and connect with the faith and connect with spirit-filled life. And how do you live that out? So this is an initiative of all over the world on that.

We have regional cabinets going on. But the real underlying question is two or three-fold. When you put those four things together you get the heartbeat of Empowered 21, especially focused on intergenerational connection and blessing. We believe Malachi is true, that the heart of the fathers or mothers must turn to the sons or daughters and the heart of the sons or daughters must turn to the fathers or mothers. This is intergeneration connection.

We believe that when it does happen God blesses the earth. So when generations come together we find real favor from God and blessing. We try to facilitate that with Empowered Vicari: One last question. Although it is in regards to Generation Z, I want to switch focus a little bit. Generation Z is very passionate about social justice issues, which can be wonderful. Wilson: Yeah. Every year we send out over students in the summertime on mission trips around the world.

And we find that with Generation Z when they touch it, feel it, experience it, their experience changes them forever. They are going to try to fight poverty the rest of their life and they want to make a difference. So I would encourage as we are trying to help this new generation understand what it means to be a persecuted Christian, we introduce them more to those who are going through this by a variety of means. Creative media, personal interaction, getting them in situations where they meet those persecuted for the faith, for example.

But I think exposure is the key. They need to touch it, feel it, meet them, and experience the situational moment that persecuted Christians are in. Nice and deep interview and concluding comment you have captured on the blog.

They need to touch…, feel…, meet…, and experience the situational moment that persecuted Christians are in. Assistant there, I am so happy to see and hear this man of God give leadership and guidance to the university. Oral would be so pleased, as am I. While I am pleased that you interviewed Dr. When it lost its accreditation and its United Methodist approval back in , it never saw the value of trying to regain that status.

Thank you for posting this interview. Wilson is a great man of God and a wonderful leader. I believe that his insightful and spiritually vibrant leadership will continue to be a great blessing to Oral Roberts University.

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President of oral roberts university

President of oral roberts university