Seaweed menstruation-menstruation | Health Topics | infoawl.com

When I got my first period at 12, I was home alone. I also thought my symptoms could only be fixed with birth control. In a hateful, premenstrual bout, I seethed at her cheery demeanor and clear skin. What could she possibly know about the torture that I endured on a monthly basis? Then it hit me: What did I know?

New to Care2? Achieving and maintaining an optimal weight unique to you is an important aspect of regulating your menstrual cycle. Figure 1. Seaweed menstruation and soy: companion foods in Asian cuisine and their effects on thyroid function in American women. Int J Cancer. As there were no material differences, we present only the per-day results.

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An eighth of a teaspoon Seaweed menstruation ground ginger power is tested head-to-head against the leading drug for the alleviation of painful periods. Cancer incidence in a cohort of infertile women. These species and the Atlantic brown kelp, bladderwrack Fucus mentruation Seaweed menstruation, have been shown to exert powerful anti-hypertensive activity related to angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibition [ 24 ], to possess antibacterial and antioxidant properties related to their high polyphenolic content [ 25 ], and to prevent dioxin absorption and accelerate dioxin excretion in rats [ 26 ]. Elevated serum estradiol and testosterone concentrations are associated with a Seaweed menstruation Spi models for breast cancer. These variations may be attributable to differences in dietary exposures such as higher seaweed consumption among Asian populations. These pilot data suggest that dietary bladderwrack may prolong the length of the menstrual cycle and exert anti-estrogenic effects in pre-menopausal women. Antivir Chem Chemother. The fiber can help you feel full on very few calories," she says. Other studies have suggested that ingestion of seaweed may reduce the risk of breast cancer due to its anti-estrogenic effects. National Center for Biotechnology InformationU. Benefits of Ginger for Menstrual Cramps An eighth of a teaspoon of ground ginger power is tested head-to-head against the leading drug for mwnstruation alleviation of painful periods.

It feel so fortunate to be able to support women who are struggling with:.

  • Rates of estrogen-dependent cancers are among the highest in Western countries and lower in the East.
  • Ever wonder why Ariel as in "The Little Mermaid" has such a hot bod?
  • Do calcium citrate and calcium carbonate have as much lead as calcium supplements derived from dolomite and animal bone?

The reason? All the hormones in our endocrine system that work together to carry out vital functions and promote homeostasis the state of equilibrium in the body, are influenced by many factors, including what we eat. In particular the balance of progesterone and oestrogen the primary cycle hormones that fluctuate throughout our monthly cycles is imperative not only for hormone health, but overall physical mental and emotional well-being.

Certain nutrients help support hormone detoxification, influence hormone activity or promote their production. Vitamin C, found in foods such as dark leafy greens, citrus and parsley, is a key to help the production of cortisol, which influences our stress response, while magnesium-rich foods such as tofu, dark greens and nuts may help to support PMS-associated water retention and menstrual pain.

Keeping our blood sugar levels steady also contributes to overall hormone balance, helping to reduce mood swings and better manage weight, sleep and cravings. To do this, try eating balanced meals filled with fibre and protein at regular intervals, and being mindful of the types of sugars and carbohydrates that we are eating. Tapping into the intelligence of the female body and responding to its unique needs is a huge act of personal care.

A diet based around whole, plant-based foods, quality proteins and healthy fats is a good foundation, and include some of these cycle-supporting foods to your shopping basket each week to help with hormone harmony. Day one of our cycle is the first day of menstruation. At the start of the cycle, our hormones are at their lowest as they work to shed the uterine lining. Because of this hormonal dip, energy levels are likely to be low, so support the body with plenty of filtered water and unprocessed, nutrient rich foods that keep energy and blood sugar levels steady.

A good mix of lean proteins, healthy fats and low GI complex carbohydrates such as root vegetables, wholegrain and legume-packed stews, can support the energy-intensive process of menstruation. If possible, include cooked, fermented, sprouted or activated foods as they may be easier to digest, because as some of the breaking down process has already begun. Include plenty of iron-rich foods such as lentils, kelp, pumpkin seeds, dried prunes and spinach and, if you eat animal products, grass-fed beef, eggs and fish are also a good source of heme iron, which that help to replenish iron levels that can be lost during our bleed.

This is also a timely moment to make healthier food choices as lower levels of hormones may make it a time of the month when women often report feeling less hungry. Hormone levels, while still low, are beginning to rise as your egg follicles mature, in preparation for ovulation.

We may be starting to feel more energised, and potentially including more exercise, so this is a good time to incorporate light, fresh and vibrant foods, such as salads and fermented foods like kefir, probiotic yoghurt or sauerkraut, which support gut health and detoxification. With rising oestrogen, some women find that they have more energy, focus and willpower at this time, so it may also be an optimal time to begin your healthy eating plan or give that 7-day cleanse a go.

Once the egg has matured, we move into the ovulatory phase. Hormone levels are rising, particularly oestrogen as it aids in the ovulation process. Our basal body temperature also increases, which can impact increased energy levels. Excess oestrogen can have negative impact on our cycle including breast tenderness and increased spots, so nutrients that support the liver to remove oestrogen are good to include and are found in foods such as kale, broccoli, onions, garlic and radishes.

Hormone levels reach their peak as we approach menstruation and many women experience PMS around this time. The same applies to sugar; if you are prone to cravings, they may be at their highest during this week and carbohydrates may be what you are craving, however just ensure they are complex ones such as like brown rice, pasta or bread the husks are filled with energy with and stress- supporting B vitamins and fibre to help curb cravings and balance those moods.

This is also a good time of the month to cut down on caffeine and alcohol, as these stimulants can aggravate PMS- triggered anxiety and mood shifts. Coffee and alcohol can also interfere with the absorption of essential vitamins and minerals required for optimal menstrual health, so try some alternatives like sparkling fruit water, herbal teas, chicory root or swap your morning latte for a caffeine free one. Sound like a lot of planning?

Aim to make small changes and keep a note of what works for you. We use cookies to improve your experience on our site. If you continue to use this site we will assume that you are ok with this.

See our Privacy Policy and Terms of Use for more information. Share Tweet Pin Link. Everyday how to. Oct 4, What foods to eat during your cycle. Luteal Phase Shopping List Ideas: Cauliflower Cucumber water retention Squash Caffeine- free herbal teas Sesame seeds Spinach Brown rice Protein of choice: tofu, chicken, lean meats, fish and seafood Berries Turmeric latte blend Dark chocolate Supplements and herbs Viridian : 7-day sugar detox: to keep sugar cravings at bay Ashwagandha : Known for its ability to help the body adapt to stress Viridian Mg with B6 : For anxiety, tension and promoting sleep.

Better You Magnesium bath salts : W ater retention and anxiety Sound like a lot of planning? See your app calendar to learn more about your cycle and it's phases. Recent Related. Track your moods, hormone cycle and world.

Gynecol Oncol. Study of Osteoporotic Fractures Research Group. The critical role of hormones in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers in women and prostate cancer in men has long been recognized. Older Videos. Which foods and cooking methods should we choose and avoid, given the role advanced glycation end products glycotoxins may play in polycystic ovary syndrome PCOS? Further, these studies also suggest that seaweed may be another important dietary component apart from soy that is responsible for the reduced risk of estrogen-related cancers observed in Japanese populations.

Seaweed menstruation. All Videos for Menstruation

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Eat for your unique cycle - foods to avoid period cramps | Pranin Organic

Rates of estrogen-dependent cancers are among the highest in Western countries and lower in the East. These variations may be attributable to differences in dietary exposures such as higher seaweed consumption among Asian populations.

The edible brown kelp, Fucus vesiculosus bladderwrack , as well as other brown kelp species, lower plasma cholesterol levels. Since cholesterol is a precursor to sex hormone biosynthesis, kelp consumption may alter circulating sex hormone levels and menstrual cycling patterns. In particular, dietary kelp may be beneficial to women with or at high risk for estrogen-dependent diseases. Intake of bladderwrack was associated with significant increases in menstrual cycle lengths, ranging from an increase of 5.

In addition, hormone measurements ascertained for one woman revealed significant anti-estrogenic and progestagenic effects following kelp administration.

Mean baseline progesterone levels rose from 0. These pilot data suggest that dietary bladderwrack may prolong the length of the menstrual cycle and exert anti-estrogenic effects in pre-menopausal women. Further, these studies also suggest that seaweed may be another important dietary component apart from soy that is responsible for the reduced risk of estrogen-related cancers observed in Japanese populations. However, these studies will need to be performed in well-controlled clinical trials to confirm these preliminary findings.

Epidemiological studies show that incidence rates of estrogen-dependent diseases such as cancers of the breast, endometrium and ovary are among the highest in Western, industrialized countries, while rates are much lower in China and Japan [ 1 , 2 ]. These disparities may be attributable, in part, to differences in dietary and environmental exposures associated with affluent and modern lifestyles that promote estrogenic stimulation and hormone imbalances [ 3 - 5 ].

In estrogen-sensitive tissues, estrogen triggers cell proliferation, and through prolonged stimulation, hyperplasia [ 9 ] and possibly neoplasia can occur. Reproductive factors associated with increased exposure to menstruation resulting in persistent and sustained estrogenic stimulation, such as shorter menstrual cycles, reduced parity, early menarche, and late menopause, are known to increase risk of endometriosis and estrogen-dependent cancers [ 10 , 11 ], while post-menopausal obesity, hormone replacement therapy and alcohol consumption may be associated with increased breast cancer risk [ 12 - 14 ].

Therefore, limiting exposure to estrogens and reducing the overall number of menstrual cycles in one's lifetime through dietary and lifestyle changes may be the simplest means to reduce disease risk.

In particular, the identification of dietary compounds that have estrogen- reducing effects holds great promise in developing chemopreventive strategies to abrogate risk of these diseases. Studies show that Japanese women have longer menstrual cycle lengths greater than the 28 day average and lower circulating estrogen levels compared to Western populations [ 15 - 17 ], which until now has been at least partly attributed to the increased intake of soy protein among Asian populations [ 18 - 20 ].

A major source of dietary seaweed among Japanese populations is the edible brown kelp, wakame Undaria pinnatifida and kombu Laminaria japonica. These species and the Atlantic brown kelp, bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosus , have been shown to exert powerful anti-hypertensive activity related to angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibition [ 24 ], to possess antibacterial and antioxidant properties related to their high polyphenolic content [ 25 ], and to prevent dioxin absorption and accelerate dioxin excretion in rats [ 26 ].

Other chemopreventive properties such as antiviral activity [ 27 , 28 ], immunostimulatory effects [ 29 ], anti-proliferative effects on 7,dimethylbenz a -anthracene-induced rat mammary tumors [ 30 , 31 ], and anti-tumor and anti-metastatic activities in xenograft mouse models [ 32 ], have been associated with the high level of sulfated polysaccharides, also known as fucoidans, found in brown seaweed. Intake of bladderwrack, as well as other brown kelp species, also has been shown to alter cholesterol metabolism and to significantly lower plasma cholesterol levels [ 33 , 34 ].

A possible mechanism of action involves competitive inhibition by fucosterols found in kelp. Until now, no studies have been performed in humans to determine the effects of brown kelp on menstrual cycling patterns and sex hormone status in pre-menopausal women, particularly in women with or at risk for estrogen-dependent diseases.

Three pre-menopausal women with abnormal menstrual cycling histories volunteered for the present study. Subject 1 had a history of hypermenorrhea excessive blood loss during menstruation , polymenorrhea shorter than average menstrual cycle length of 28 days , anovulatory menstrual cycles, and was diagnosed with luteal phase deficiency and endometriosis through laparoscopy.

Subject 2 suffered from hypermenorrhea and polymenorrhea. Subject 3 suffered from hypermenorrhea and was diagnosed with endometriosis. All three women reported a history of dysmenorrhea painful menses. Otherwise, all women were in general good health and free of any chronic diseases. All women were active and exercised approximately three times per week. No soy protein products were consumed during the study period.

The nature of the study was explained, and written informed consent was obtained from all study subjects. Two capsules were administered daily for the low dose treatment mg and four capsules were administered daily for the high dose treatment 1. All women provided self-reported menstrual cycling histories for the three months prior to the treatment period.

Ovulation was monitored through body basal temperature. During the treatment period, serum hormone levels were measured on days 12 and 21 for the first cycle which was another anovulatory cycle and on day 21 thereafter during the treatment period.

Subsequently, Subjects 1 and 3 agreed to continue the experiment for two additional cycles at which time they received a daily dose of 1. Menstrual cycling logs were maintained on all subjects during the entire course of the experiment. Subjects were monitored at least weekly to insure compliance to the supplement regimen. Blank and control sera were run with each assay. Statistical analyses were performed by unpaired t-tests 2-sided with a commercially available statistical software package Stata, College Station, Texas.

Results are referred to as borderline significant for 0. There were no adverse side effects reported and bladderwrack was well tolerated by all three women. Specifically, in Subject 1, who had a year history of irregular menses, the menstrual cycle length increased from an average of In Subject 2, the average cycle length increased 5.

Subject 3 exhibited a 4-day increase in menstrual cycle length from Black bars indicate the averages of 3 menstrual cycles; diagonal striped and white bars indicate the averages of 2 menstrual cycles; and whiskers indicate standard deviations. Subject 1 reported the most significant reduction in total days of menstruation, changing from an average 9. Subject 2, who only took the low dose, also experienced a marked reduction in number of days of menstruation, from 8.

Subject 3 exhibited a decrease in total menstruating days averaging from 6. Subjects 1 and 3, who both suffered from endometriosis, reported substantial alleviation from pain during menstruation and throughout the menstrual cycle following bladderwrack treatment. Each bar indicates averages from two menstrual cycles; whiskers indicate standard deviations. Furthermore, mean baseline progesterone level rose from 0. The results of this preliminary pilot study suggest that bladderwrack consumption can effectively increase the length of the menstrual cycle and reduce the total number of days of menstruation in pre-menopausal women.

These effects were most marked in the two women that had shorter than average cycles 16 and 23 days versus the normal range of 26 to 32 days seen in women in Western populations. Menstrual cycles were further lengthened with increasing dose, which may suggest a linear dose-response effect.

Nonetheless, these marked increases in menstrual cycle length may have beneficial health effects in lowering risk of estrogen-dependent diseases such as endometriosis and ovarian, endometrial, and breast cancers as reported in a number of studies [ 16 , 35 - 38 ]. Menstrual characteristics are surrogate markers that may reflect a woman's overall exposure to and production of endogenous hormones.

Shorter menstrual cycle lengths and prolonged menstruation confer longer follicular and luteal phases where estrogen and progesterone levels and endometrial and breast cell proliferation rates are at their highest.

A nearly fourfold increase in mitotic activity in the breast lobules occurs during the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle [ 39 ], while the highest proliferation rates nearly fold in the endometrium occur during the follicular phase [ 40 ]. Therefore, fewer menstrual cycles over a woman's lifetime would decrease the amount of time during which the breast and endometrial epithelia would be exposed to high levels of proliferation, which may decrease overall disease risk.

While estrogen's proliferative effects on mammary gland development and endometrial and breast tumorigenesis are well documented, progesterone's role in these processes is not as well defined. Studies show that progesterone deficiency is associated with increased endometrial cancer incidence [ 41 ], and that progesterone inhibits estrogen-induced luminal epithelial proliferation in the uterus [ 42 ].

However, progesterone has been shown to both stimulate and inhibit the growth of experimental mammary tumors [ 43 ], and the use of synthetic progestins in hormone replacement therapy has been associated with an increased risk of breast cancer [ 43 ].

Experimental rat models have elucidated progesterone's vital role in pregnancy-induced morphological changes in the breast, which confer protection against breast cancer [ 44 ].

Further, epidemiological studies suggest that it is not pregnancy alone but early first parity and increasing number of pregnancies that are associated with reduced breast cancer risk [ 45 , 46 ]. Due to the small number of subjects and the lack of a control group, this study will need to be repeated in a larger, randomized population of women with placebo controls. Other weaknesses of the present study are the lack of data on luteinizing hormone and follicular stimulating hormone levels which would provide pertinent information regarding the effects of dietary bladderwrack on ovulation and the luteal and follicular phases of the menstrual cycle.

The potential beneficial impact that dietary bladderwrack may have on abrogating symptoms of endometriosis warrants a closer look at a larger population of women suffering from this disease. However, studies should also be performed in women with normal menstrual cycles who have sex hormone levels within clinically normal ranges to determine the impact of dietary kelp on menstrual cycling patterns and hormone levels in the general population.

Such changes may be beneficial particularly with regard to women at high risk of estrogen-dependent diseases or who are experiencing fertility problems. Results from these preliminary experiments also suggest that bladderwrack administration may alleviate hypermenorrhea and dysmenorrhea, which may provide some relief in the treatment of endometriosis. Although these reported effects are generally in a beneficial direction, their clinical significance is yet to be determined in a well-controlled study.

The critical role of hormones in breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers in women and prostate cancer in men has long been recognized. Given the vast rise of these cancers in the U. Future investigations should clarify the role of bladderwrack and other seaweed species on estrogen and progesterone metabolism, to evaluate its potential binding affinity to estrogen and progesterone receptors, and to determine its effects on proliferation in hormone-sensitive tissues.

These investigations should also be expanded to include effects of bladderwrack on other sex hormones including the androgens and gonadotropins. In this regard, animal and in vitro studies are currently underway in our laboratory to elucidate the potential mechanisms and clinical relevance of bladderwrack bioactivity, and to identify and isolate the active components involved. Written consent was obtained from the patients for publication of study.

Thanks to Dr. Martyn T. Smith for his guidance and support. National Center for Biotechnology Information , U. Published online Aug 4. Christine F Skibola 1. Author information Article notes Copyright and License information Disclaimer. Corresponding author. Christine F Skibola: ude. Received Jan 14; Accepted Aug 4. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC.

Abstract Background Rates of estrogen-dependent cancers are among the highest in Western countries and lower in the East. Case Presentation Intake of bladderwrack was associated with significant increases in menstrual cycle lengths, ranging from an increase of 5. Conclusions These pilot data suggest that dietary bladderwrack may prolong the length of the menstrual cycle and exert anti-estrogenic effects in pre-menopausal women.

Background Epidemiological studies show that incidence rates of estrogen-dependent diseases such as cancers of the breast, endometrium and ovary are among the highest in Western, industrialized countries, while rates are much lower in China and Japan [ 1 , 2 ]. Case presentation Three pre-menopausal women with abnormal menstrual cycling histories volunteered for the present study. Table 1 Study Subject Characteristics. Open in a separate window. Source and dose of bladderwrack Fucus vesiculosus Dried, powdered bladderwrack was obtained from Maine Coast Sea Vegetables Franklin, ME and encapsulated in mg capsules.